Richard Ehrman
 
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Both the Berklee community and the community of lovers and teachers of the Feldenkrais Method® of Somatic Education lost a true treasure in the fall of 2008, when Richard Ehrman unexpectedly passed away.  A long-time employee in the Berklee concert office, Richard steadily built a thriving for-credit program of "Awareness Training for Musicians" at Berklee which, at the time of his passing, served some 50-60 Berklee students per semester. He also taught a level II class to a smaller group, and had just begun a course on Somatic Breathwork for Singer s.  Many students reported that this class was the one of the most valuable classes they had attended at the school.

Read what Richard's students had to say about the class.
Read Richard's own description of Awareness Training for Musicians.

The Richard Ehrman Memorial Feldenkrais Series at Berklee seeks to honor Rich's legacy by brining the Feldenkrais work he loved to the community to which he devoted so much. Each class in the series is presented by different Certified Feldenkrais Teacher, and focuses on a specific aspect of movement and awareness and their relevance to musicians.

The series is made possible thanks to the support of the Berklee community and the LiveWell program at Berklee.

All events are in The Loft*  and are FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

*To access The Loft, enter 921 Boylston Street, take elevator to 3rd Floor, turn right and take short flight of stairs. The Loft is at the end of the hall.

- The 2013-14 REMF Series -

 
Thursday, October 3, 2013 6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Less is MORE — on the Path to Effortless Mastery

LESS: effort, strain, pain, injury, frustration, waste of time and energy

MORE: ease, sound, agility, creativity, flow, groove, music, mastery, satisfaction

You know those masters of their art who seem to make music effortlessly? What if that effortlessness is not so much the result of mastery as it is a path to mastery?

In this workshop you will experience how becoming aware of yourself and what you are doing can make a difficult task more achievable once you stop trying so hard. We will also explore how to apply this sort of awareness to the arts (for they are, in truth, separate arts) of practicing and making music.

Josh Schreiber Shalem Josh Schreiber Shalem, MM, GCFP grew up playing the cello, but was forced to stop right after college due to chronic hand pain. A ten-year journey of growth and healing eventually lead him to the Feldenkrais Method,® and from there to a Masters in viola da gamba at the Longy School of Music. Now once again an active performing musician, he is a founding member of the ensembles Seven Times Salt, Long & Away, Musica Nuova and Meravelha.  In addition to his private practice, Josh has taught Feldenkrais to musicians at the Longy School of Music, New England Conservatory, the Amherst Early Music Festival, and helped complete Richard Ehrman’s last semester at Berklee.

Josh is the coordinator of the Richard Ehrman Memorial Feldenkrais series at Berklee.
Find him at www.discover-yourself.com and www.discover-yourself.com/music.

NEW! Lunch-time workshop!

     Monday, November 4, 2013, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Centering the breath

What does it feel like to be Centered? Relaxed, yet focused; calm, yet ready for action. Exactly what we need to be effective musicians (not to mention human beings).

Join Josh Schreiber Shalem, musician and Feldenkrais teacher, for a bit of mid-day relaxation, and experience how feeling your breath in your center can leave you feeling mentally centered. (Bonus if you also make sound with your breath!)


Thursday, November 7, 2013,
6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Creating Resonance

What are the conditions for creating a rich vibrant ringing sound that communicates powerfully and evocatively with your audience?

Whether you are a vocalist, an instrumentalist or both, explore how awareness of your breath, mouth, nostrils, teeth, tongue and palate can balance your over all muscle tone and support your easy, authentic, expressive sound.

Vocalists and instrumentalists will be invited to make sounds before, during and after to notice the effect of the Feldenkrais lesson. Dress comfortably for lying on a mat on the floor, and bring a favorite poem.

Margo HennebachMargo Hennebach, GCFP, LGSM(MT) first started playing piano to get out of washing the dishes after family dinners, and has never looked back. With a BM in Piano from Oberlin and a post grad degree in Music Therapy from the Guildhall School of Music in England, she practiced music therapy for several years before being drawn back to performing original music, most recently with her international trio, Mad Agnes. A songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and singer, she discovered how Feldenkrais made everything easier--not just music--and became a practitioner in 2003.

When not performing, she teaches privately, leads workshops and classes, and occasionally washes dishes. She is honored to participate in this series.

 www.margohennebach.com


Thursday, December 5, 2013 6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Bye Bye Stage-Fright

“Stage fright” or “stage presence”? No matter where we are situated on the ‘stage of life’, we would like to be comfortable in our own bones while in the presence of others. We will explore the relevance of Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement® as preparation to perform with aplomb. By using ATM processes as exploratory tools we may enhance our own ‘image of self’.

For performers of all kinds: musicians, poets, performance artists -- anyone who wishes to be at ease with themselves in relation to others.

Come prepared to try it out!  Bring your instrument and a short (under 60 second) excerpt to perform.  Ladies - bring your high heals!

Deborah Elizabeth LotusDeborah Elizabeth Lotus GCFT began her movement explorations with Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais in the early 70’s at Esalen Institute in California and continued her training with him through the early 80’s. Her private practice is in Cambridge and Mexico and she has taught Feldenkrais at Harvard, Cambridge Center for Adult Education, Longy School of Music.

She is pleased to be part of this Feldenkrais series at Berklee College of Music—a fitting tribute to her colleague Richard Ehrman.

 
Thursday, February 6, 2014 6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Reaching for Perfection (Further adventures On the Path to Effortless Mastery)

You know those masters of their art who seem to make music effortlessly? What if that effortlessness is not so much the result of mastery as it is a path to mastery?

"All well and good," you say, "but how do you get better without hard work?

Most people, when they find that something isn't working, try harder at exactly the thing that doesn't work. Musicians know we can't afford to do that. Instead, we need to figure out how to do things differently, in a way that works better. In this workshop we'll explore how to get better at something though curious exploration.

Incidentally, the "something" we'll be improving in this workshop is the surprisingly involved action of reaching -- connecting your hands to your center, and freeing up your throat and your breathing while you're at it.

Josh Schreiber Shalem Josh Schreiber Shalem, MM, GCFP grew up playing the cello, but was forced to stop right after college due to chronic hand pain. A ten-year journey of growth and healing eventually lead him to the Feldenkrais Method,® and from there to a Masters in viola da gamba at the Longy School of Music. Now once again an active performing musician, he is a founding member of the ensembles Seven Times Salt, Long & Away, Musica Nuova and Meravelha.  In addition to his private practice, Josh has taught Feldenkrais to musicians at the Longy School of Music, New England Conservatory, the Amherst Early Music Festival, and helped complete Richard Ehrman’s last semester at Berklee.

Josh is the coordinator of the Richard Ehrman Memorial Feldenkrais series at Berklee.
Find him at www.discover-yourself.com and www.discover-yourself.com/music.

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Thursday, March 6, 2014 6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Trip Thrillingly Off the Tongue

Did you know that your tongue, that extraordinary muscular organ in our mouth, is composed of thousands of cells connected to the brain (the one in our head and the one in our gut)? Anchored by webs of tough tissue, mucosa, and the hyloid bone, the tongue is in constant use; consciously for eating, speaking, or caressing, and unconsciously in reacting to tension and anxiety, by becoming locked and “tongue-tied,” resulting in a tightened jaw, contracted eyes, neck, and/or shoulder muscles, and a constricted throat.

In this unique Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement workshop we will learn to use and discern the intrinsic muscles that alter the shape of the tongue, through lengthening and shortening, curling and uncurling, flattening and rounding, and use the extrinsic facial muscles to help protrude, retract, depress, and elevate the tongue for clearer articulation.

Please use a toothbrush to clear your mouth of excess debris before the lesson if possible.

Expect a sleep-full night sleep from a newly softened, freely mobile tongue and jaw, a differencein tonguing and a clarity in diction.

Misha Forrester, MS, GCFP, LMT has been involved in the Feldenkrais Method® for almost two decades, originally as a client and transcriber for advanced Feldenkrais trainings including Bones for Life® with Ruthy Alon. Misha resides in the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts. After a serious automobile crash that left her with 17 broken ribs and six months of staring at a ceiling, she became attracted to the Feldenkrais Method because of its attention to gentle nuances that allow for an increase in movement and joint fluidity without pain, and a reflective capacity for self-regulation in movement. Now fully capable of somersaults, headstands, and a few cartwheels, she is the Feldenkrais practitioner and massage therapist at the Kushi Institute Center for Natural Healing where she teaches Awareness Through Movement® classes and works with a variety of international guests, many with serious digestive issues and cancers, in one-on-one Functional Integration® sessions. She is honored to participate in this series.

Find her at www.kushiinstitute.org

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Thursday, April 3, 2014 6:15 - 7:45 p.m.

Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, Hands and Fingers

In this Feldenkrais and drawing workshop, we will begin by drawing our attention to the subtle and revealing movement of our musical instruments. We might ask - as you have no doubt asked many times before - how do we hold these instruments? How do we hold ourselves, our hands, as we play? Where does the skillful manipulation of our fingers begin? In our hands or in our heads? What about the pelvis, the undulation of the spine, the opening and closing of the eyes and the connection of our feet to the floor? What we see in our mind’s eye while making music can help to illuminate how we move as we play, so we will draw from imagination as well as from life in this Feldenkrais and drawing session.

Bring your instrument! I’ll bring some Feldenkrais sitting lessons along with some paper, pencils and a few keen observations about the alignment of the senses from Kimon Nicolaides’ The Natural Way to Draw.

Hellen Miller, GCFP is a Teaching Fellow in Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. She received her BA in Art Practice and English from UC Berkeley in 2006, her EdM in Arts in Education from Harvard in 2010, her Feldenkrais certification from The Feldenkrais Institute in 2013 and is currently enrolled in the Harvard Graduate School of Design’s Art in the Public Domain program. Helen has performed and exhibited at Mobius, Cambridge, MA, 2013; White Walls, Boston, MA, 2012; Saprophyt Space, Vienna, Italy, 2012; The Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Cambridge, MA, 2011; Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2004, among others. She has taught drawing and movement at The Derek Bok Center, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2012; Dia Art Foundation, Beacon, NY, 2011; The Noguchi Museum, Long Island City, NY, 2011; The Guggenheim and Festival of Ideas for the New City, NY, 2011; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, 2011; Trade School, New York, NY, 2011; Industry City, Brooklyn, NY, 2011; Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2010, among others. She has written on art for The Feldenkrais Journal and The Drawing Center in New York. She has curated exhibitions, performances, panel discussions and poetry readings in Cambridge and Rome as part of Rover Dig and BYO: Voices of the Contemporary at the Carpenter Center. She is a recipient of the Derek Bok Center for Undergraduate Education’s Distinction in Teaching Award and a regular visiting artist at Mildred's Lane, Narrowsburg, PA. Helen is currently exploring the capacity for intimacy in portrait painting and the role of beauty in human development and teaches a weekly Feldenkrais class on the nature of turnout for dancers.

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Fall 2013:

Thursday, October 3
Less is More: on the path to Effortless Mastery
Josh Schreiber Shalem

Monday, November 4
Centering the Breath
Josh Schreiber Shalem

Thursday, November 7
Creating Resonance
Margo Hennebach

Thursday, December 5
Bye-bye Stage Fright!
Deborah Elizabeth Lotus

Spring 2014

Thursday, February 6
Reaching for Perfection
Josh Schreiber Shalem

Thursday, March 6
Trip Thrillingly Off the Tongue
Misha Forrester

Thursday, April 3
Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, Hands and Fingers
Hellen Miller

See previous seasons:

Fall 2013

2012-2013

Spring 2012

 

   
Feldenkrais®, Feldenkrais Method®, Awareness Through Movement®, and ATM® are service marks of the Feldenkrais Guild of North America